Archive for Novels

Golden Threads in the Darkness

GOLDEN THREADS IN THE DARKNESS

One time during a spa therapy session
A reiki master told me something like
I had a golden thread coming out of my crown
It sure sounded interesting and unusual
Rather like a colorful radiating thread perhaps, making some
Sort of cosmic connection I figure.
Must have been in a state of enlightenment or deep tranquility at that point.
Seems now that the golden thread-feeling is not as
Strong as it was then or recently;
Something perhaps about big city living
With its discourteous people, hard and harsh and uncaring people around
With its hard surfaces and jostling mass transit rides
With delays, constant noise, irregularities in the day and in the schedules of others;
Bickering and complaining and pests inside and outside…
Worldliness can tarnish the natural good inside of us;
Making us prone to sickness and vulnerable to troubles of all sorts and from all sides;
The world and where you work can indeed make you sick;
Just the getting there can make anyone rattled and unsettled.
That does not mean we can be rude or stop caring.
We can be even more civil and caring and disciplined and gracious-
The more people who are so, the better everyone will be.
Golden threads connecting us all, inside and outside and with each other,
Radiating rainbow colors and light, life and vibrant energy to others and within us.

Divi Logan, Chicago. 2013.

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Nashville Nature: Naturally Every Day

Dateline Nashville, Tennessee: Featuring a fine listing of the good things that are natural in Nashville.

White-breasted Nuthatch in Algonquin Provincia...

White-breasted Nuthatch in Algonquin Provincial Park, Canada. This image is not upside-down. Français : Sittelle à poitrine blanche dans le parc provincial Algonquin, dans l’Ontario. Cette image est à l’endroit. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Just in our yard alone, for bird species we have had the following birds of prey: Peregrine Falcon, Northern Goshawk,
Cooper’s Hawk, Screech Owl, Great Horned Owl,  Red-tailed Hawk, and Barred Owl.

We have seen the following smaller birds that love to hang out in the berry-bearing shrubs, trees, and plants: Cedar Waxwing,
Black and White Warbler, Cape May Warbler,  Black-Capped Chickadee, Titmouse, and Rose-breasted Grosbeak.Our usual visitors include the American Robin, Blue Jay, Cardinal, American Crow. We have also been visited by the Pileated Woodpecker, “Yellow-shafted” Flicker, Downy Woodpecker, Brown Thrasher, Yellow-bellied Sapsucker,  Mourning Dove, White-throated Sparrow, Ruby-throated Hummingbird, the House Finch, Common Grackle, Dark-eyed JuncoRuby-crowned Kinglet,  Great Crested Flycatcher, and the White-breasted Nuthatch.

The loud songs of the Carolina Wren and the movements of the House Wren; the odd call of the Common Nighthawk, the stunning colors and calls of the American Goldfinch, the melodious trilling of the elusive Wood Thrush, and the call to tea of the Rufus-sided (Eastern) Towhee have also graced our landscape.

Unusual visitors include the Great Blue Heron, which one day landed on our roof. There have been possible sightings of Summer Tanager, Prothonotary Warbler, and American Redstart. Also a possible hearing of the call of the Ivory-billed Woodpecker- the sound described is so distinctive and it was in the Woodmont- Hillsboro area of Nashville. The call sounds like a toy trumpet, a high-pitched nasal yank, like a loud version of the eastern White-breasted Nuthatch, and that is exactly the sound I detected. A single note but very loud and close by one day many years ago. There are many tall, old trees in the area so it is a fine place for a large woodpecker to reside and find food. One sighting of Whooping Crane; possible sighting of Ivory Gull and also a Little Blue Heron. In the area are reports of other hummingbird species off course every so often (birds that probably should be at that time in California or other places west of Tennessee turn up in middle Tennessee!).

In the Nashville area, aside from the usual city birds of Mockingbird, European Starling, Pigeon (European Rock Dove), Turkey Vulture, Catbird and Canada Geese, you can also see the Green Herons (a family of them hung out in a tree in Centennial Park one year), the Yellow-crowned Night Heron, Black-crowned Night Heron (with their magnificent plumage), Kingfishers, Rough-legged Hawk, and the American Kestrel. You also see the Red-winged Blackbird, Ovenbird, Eastern Bluebird, Barn Swallow, Killdeer, American Coot, Merlin, Broad-winged Hawk, Northern Harrier, and Mallard Duck.

Also seen are coyotes, deer, red foxes, and raccoons. We also have an abundance of dragonflies. Species you might find in the Nashville area include the Gray Petaltail, the Common Green Darner, Comet Darner, Swamp Darner and Fawn Darner. You might also see the Shadow Darner, Ashy Clubtail, Cobra Clubtail, Eastern Ringtail, and the stunning Royal River Cruiser. Possibilities include as well the Widow Skimmer, the Twelve-spotted Skimmer, and the strikingly colored Spangled Skimmer and Eastern Amberwing.

English: Common Green Darner (Anax junius), bl...

English: Common Green Darner (Anax junius), blue form female, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Yellow-crowned Night Heron flying over water.

Yellow-crowned Night Heron flying over water. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Isn’t nature wonderful? Let’s all work together to keep our environment safe, clean, healthy, good and beautiful!

English: A female ruby-throated hummingbird (A...

English: A female ruby-throated hummingbird (Archilochus colubris) sipping nectar from scarlet beebalm (Monarda didyma). Français : Un Colibri à gorge rubis (Archilochus colubris) femelle butinant une fleur de Monarde (Monarda didyma). (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Divi Logan, Nashville and Chicago, 2012.

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Illinois Prays for Rain

A Dust Bowl storm approaches Stratford, Texas ...

A Dust Bowl storm approaches Stratford, Texas in 1935. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

We in the dust bowl listen
Listen for the patter of nourishing rain;

We look to the skies for those gray-black lines
Heralding the approach of precipitation again.

The rolling thunder we await;
The darkening and humid veils of moisture
To give relief to the farmers again.

In this monotonous lack of rain,
In the days of partly cloudy, mostly sunny and
“A chance of rain”…

We look to those skies for that precious water
To bring us, parched in mind, arid in spirit,
We who look day by day
Skyward at the slightest mention of rain,
We who hope for rain
Pray it shall come soon.

The forecasters say we really need
Nine to fifteen inches just to bring
Even the slightest relief to the drought.
What extra must we have
For the crops to prosper?
Is there even a chance for any of the farms to green again?
Is there a chance for so great an amount of rain?

O let the rolling storms come again,
And bring relief to this dry land.

raining sheets

raining sheets (Photo credit: mytimemachine)

Divi Logan, Nashville and Chicago, 2012.

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Agent Orange Corn: A Little 2,4-D in Your Sauce?

Hello Chicago and Good Day, World!

English: Image from MolInspiration's 3-D struc...

English: Image from MolInspiration’s 3-D structure of 2,4-Dichlorophenoaceric acid. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Listening to local radio station NewsRadio 780 WBBM in Chicago this morning, I heard the introduction to a story that seemed curious and serious at the same time. It referred to something called “agent orange corn”, and the reality of the “super-weed“. Certainly the super – weed concept has been known for decades, if some documents are accurate, and the use of extremely toxic herbicides has also been known for decades. Also known is the excellent book, Silent Spring, by Rachel Carson. I am presently reading that scientific treatise, and by coincidence a page I just finished mentioned the extremely potent compound known as 2,4-D. What exactly is 2,4-D? According to a book titled The Science of 2,4,5-T and associated phenoxy herbicides, which I found in the reference section of the Harold Washington Library in the Chicago Loop, the full name of the chemical is 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid. That’s a mouthful, and wow what it can do to you or to anything it gets into!

In fact, on page 213 of Silent Spring, is the following quote:

The herbicide 2,4-D has also produced tumorlike swellings in treated plants. Chromosomes become short, thick, clumped together. Cell division is seriously retarded. The general effect is said to parallel closely that produced by X-rays.

Other quotes or sections in Silent Spring where 2,4-D are mentioned are page 43, with a curious case of the discovery of that weed – killer compound; and pp. 75 – 79

Threaten MY soybeans and corn, will you, eh? Yecchh.

As I later learned in the news article, the substance 2,4-D is also a compound of the demon chemical used in the Vietnam War and known as Agent Orange. A rather graphic photo of a man exposed to that chemical is at the end of this article.

Think about synthesizing a strain of corn that is resistant to pests that are resisting such potent herbicides as 2,4-D. Now those researchers would have to be exposed to the compound in order to test the effectiveness of the experiment; and that also means mention of the people who must safely – and emphasize the word SAFELY- transport the hazard to the lab.

The article seemed rather confusing as it went on, seeming to imply also that the corn must also resist the potency of the 2,4-D that is meant to kill off the invading superweeds. Thus the compound might also impact the environment wherein it is being tested, getting into the air, the groundwater, the wells, and onto other plants.

Well, I’d rather have my corn without any 2,4-D sauce, thanks.

Related Vocabulary:

* Phytotoxic; hydrocarbon

* Oxidation; cell division

* Lindane, malathion, parathion, chlordane, dieldrin, heptachlor

* Carbon tetrachloride, DDT (dichloro-diphenyl-trichloro-ethane), toxaphene, benzene hexachloride, methoxychlor, phenothiazine, dinitro compounds

Suggested Sources:

1. Carson, Rachel. Silent Spring. The Classic that Launched the Environmental Movement. Boston: Houghton Mifflin/ Mariner, 1962.

2. Bovey, Rodney W. The Science of 2,4,5-T and associated phenoxy herbicides. New York: Wiley Interscience, 1980.

Major Tự Đức Phang was exposed to dioxin-conta...

Major Tự Đức Phang was exposed to dioxin-contaminated Agent Orange (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Divi Logan for ®EDUSHIRTS, Nashville and Chicago, ©2012.

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WORD BIRD

AN ORIGINAL POEM-SPEAK ON THE PROLIFERATION OF INFORMATION

For too long now I have heard

The idea that the spoken word

Is better when ’tis multiplied

Or cable- ized or tele-visionized

When talking heads speak in depth on issues

About which we hear too much

Each day we get it exponentially on

Every network for news and views

On subjects depressing and downright annoying

Or yawningly trendy or totally boring;

Purple prose goes electronic- that is the way these days

Lots of people with lots to say-

But is it truly meaningful or beneficial;

worthwhile or valuable? What is it that we want so quickly to say

On our palm devices getting smaller every day?

Whatever it is, that such and such… I wonder

Do we say too much?

Divi Logan and EDUSHIRTS, The T-shirt Curriculum, Nashville and Chicago, 2004 – 2011. Please e-mail the author at d308gtb289@aol.com for permission to use excerpts of this original poem. Courtesy counts! Thank you for your complete and absolute cooperation. =DLL=

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